Tumblr from south Chandler (#SoChan).

Twitter: @robdefran

wandrlust:

Big Surf

Arizona’s Big Surf is one of those projects that belong to the era of post-war boosterism and the unassailable self-confidence of an Arcadian dream. However, four years prior to its opening in 1969 it was just an idea — plus a 30x40 foot wave tank built by construction engineer Phil Dexter. Today we take artificial wave beaches more or less for granted, but at the time Dexter’s Big Surf ranked along with the best of the arid land utopias conjured out of a barren wilderness: Taliesin, Biltmore, Arcosanti. Under the wide aegis of the city of Phoenix, Big Surf adds its own form of Waikiki picturesque into the alchemy of surf culture, water engineering, and the notion of a truly endless summer.
When Big Surf first opened it boasted a five-foot wave every minute, but over the years the waves have become smaller and less regular, perhaps synonymous with its diminishing status among many of today’s grander artificial wave systems. Of course, surfers can still appreciate its magnitude; the system’s pumps draw 50,000 gallons of water into giant cisterns within the wall, and when the wave comes it is triggered in booming flush as gates opens and the wave forms over a concrete baffle below the water line.

wandrlust:

Big Surf

Arizona’s Big Surf is one of those projects that belong to the era of post-war boosterism and the unassailable self-confidence of an Arcadian dream. However, four years prior to its opening in 1969 it was just an idea — plus a 30x40 foot wave tank built by construction engineer Phil Dexter. Today we take artificial wave beaches more or less for granted, but at the time Dexter’s Big Surf ranked along with the best of the arid land utopias conjured out of a barren wilderness: Taliesin, Biltmore, Arcosanti. Under the wide aegis of the city of Phoenix, Big Surf adds its own form of Waikiki picturesque into the alchemy of surf culture, water engineering, and the notion of a truly endless summer.

When Big Surf first opened it boasted a five-foot wave every minute, but over the years the waves have become smaller and less regular, perhaps synonymous with its diminishing status among many of today’s grander artificial wave systems. Of course, surfers can still appreciate its magnitude; the system’s pumps draw 50,000 gallons of water into giant cisterns within the wall, and when the wave comes it is triggered in booming flush as gates opens and the wave forms over a concrete baffle below the water line.

stereogum:

Paul Simon, Jack White, & Eddie Vedder at the Mariners game.

What is going on here?

stereogum:

Paul Simon, Jack White, & Eddie Vedder at the Mariners game.

What is going on here?

Last Call — The end of the printed newspaper

Clay Shirky, pulling no punches on Medium:

The future of print remains what? Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really.

Brutal, but a must-read.

highenoughtoseethesea:

Parko
Photo: Pat Stacy

highenoughtoseethesea:

Parko

Photo: Pat Stacy

fastcompany:

Here’s how to keep in touch with your connections, without becoming a stalker.
From finding a job to meeting your next business partner or new client, you know that there are countless ways that your network can help you when you need it.
The problem is that reaching out, especially out of the blue, can feel awkward and inauthentic. You want to establish regular communication so that any requests are just part of the conversation.
So how do you reach out without feeling sketchy about the whole thing? “The key is if you strive to provide real value in your outreach, people will look forward to hearing from you, every time,” says Jenny Powers, founder of the professional women’s networking group, Running With Heels. “Soon enough, they’ll be reaching out to you as well and it won’t feel like a one way street.”
Read More>

Good tips. I like this part:

Scroll through your contacts, and when you see a post that makes you smile, respond. You probably spend a lot of time on social media anyway. You may as well get something useful out of it.

fastcompany:

Here’s how to keep in touch with your connections, without becoming a stalker.

From finding a job to meeting your next business partner or new client, you know that there are countless ways that your network can help you when you need it.

The problem is that reaching out, especially out of the blue, can feel awkward and inauthentic. You want to establish regular communication so that any requests are just part of the conversation.

So how do you reach out without feeling sketchy about the whole thing? “The key is if you strive to provide real value in your outreach, people will look forward to hearing from you, every time,” says Jenny Powers, founder of the professional women’s networking group, Running With Heels. “Soon enough, they’ll be reaching out to you as well and it won’t feel like a one way street.”

Read More>

Good tips. I like this part:

Scroll through your contacts, and when you see a post that makes you smile, respond. You probably spend a lot of time on social media anyway. You may as well get something useful out of it.

emergentfutures:


The best places to liveeconomist.com
A data-driven ranking of the most liveable cities
NOT New York nor Paris nor Tokyo. Urbanites in Britain’s former dominions should count themselves lucky, according to data from the Economist Intellige …

Paul Higgins: Woo Hoo

Melbourne is where I live and I would not want to be anywhere else although 6 months in New York would be great.

I don’t see Chandler on this list why?

emergentfutures:

The best places to live
economist.com

A data-driven ranking of the most liveable cities

NOT New York nor Paris nor Tokyo. Urbanites in Britain’s former dominions should count themselves lucky, according to data from the Economist Intellige …

Paul Higgins: Woo Hoo

Melbourne is where I live and I would not want to be anywhere else although 6 months in New York would be great.

I don’t see Chandler on this list why?

legosaurus:

California Dreamin’
Image by Andy Wells

Everything’s perfectly all right now. We’re fine. We’re all fine here now, thank you. How are you?

legosaurus:

California Dreamin’

Image by Andy Wells

Everything’s perfectly all right now. We’re fine. We’re all fine here now, thank you. How are you?