1. fastcompany:

It was one of the best publications ever done about computers—and, at the end, one of the last computer magazines, period.
Read More>

Speaking of restructuring newsrooms: Sad that so many talented and passionate journalists were unceremoniously dismissed today.Macworld was like a lifeboat for the Mac faithful, back in the dark days when it seemed certain Apple was a sinking ship.

    fastcompany:

    It was one of the best publications ever done about computers—and, at the end, one of the last computer magazines, period.

    Read More>

    Speaking of restructuring newsrooms: Sad that so many talented and passionate journalists were unceremoniously dismissed today.

    Macworld was like a lifeboat for the Mac faithful, back in the dark days when it seemed certain Apple was a sinking ship.

    Reblogged from: fastcompany
  2. Mike Sunnucks, reporting on potential changes impacting the Arizona Republic newsroom:

    Republic newsroom staffers — who asked not to be identified — are worried the restructuring could be coming to Phoenix and they will have to reapply for jobs in a new digitally oriented structure. One Gannett employee said there are worries the reorganizations could result in newsroom cuts of 10 to 15 percent. Another said the process could involve being interviewed by external hiring managers outside the Republic.

    Truly unfortunate news, if accurate. If only someone could clear the air:

    Lovely and Republic Publisher John Zidich did not respond to telephone calls or emails seeking comment.

    Republic Executive Editor and Vice Presdient Nicole Carroll declined to comment and referred questions to Zidich.

    Never mind.

  3. micdotcom:

    55 Twitter photos from space that will fill you with ethereal wonder

    Reid Wiseman is a national treasure.

    Follow micdotcom 

    Reblogged from: the-actual-universe
  4. salon:

Will The Simpsons ever be good again?

Daniel D’Addario, writing for Salon:

If FXX had really wanted to build anticipation and interest for this marathon, they should have run the episodes in reverse order; it would have been an inspiring story of a show that was mediocre for 15 years or so, then suddenly got great.

Agreed. As much as I enjoyed the #EverySimpsonsEver marathon during the first few days, I quickly lost interest once the story lines increasingly became, relatively, ridiculous. And boring.

    salon:

    Will The Simpsons ever be good again?

    Daniel D’Addario, writing for Salon:

    If FXX had really wanted to build anticipation and interest for this marathon, they should have run the episodes in reverse order; it would have been an inspiring story of a show that was mediocre for 15 years or so, then suddenly got great.

    Agreed. As much as I enjoyed the #EverySimpsonsEver marathon during the first few days, I quickly lost interest once the story lines increasingly became, relatively, ridiculous. And boring.

    Reblogged from: salon
  5. wandrlust:

Big Surf

Arizona’s Big Surf is one of those projects that belong to the era of post-war boosterism and the unassailable self-confidence of an Arcadian dream. However, four years prior to its opening in 1969 it was just an idea — plus a 30x40 foot wave tank built by construction engineer Phil Dexter. Today we take artificial wave beaches more or less for granted, but at the time Dexter’s Big Surf ranked along with the best of the arid land utopias conjured out of a barren wilderness: Taliesin, Biltmore, Arcosanti. Under the wide aegis of the city of Phoenix, Big Surf adds its own form of Waikiki picturesque into the alchemy of surf culture, water engineering, and the notion of a truly endless summer.
When Big Surf first opened it boasted a five-foot wave every minute, but over the years the waves have become smaller and less regular, perhaps synonymous with its diminishing status among many of today’s grander artificial wave systems. Of course, surfers can still appreciate its magnitude; the system’s pumps draw 50,000 gallons of water into giant cisterns within the wall, and when the wave comes it is triggered in booming flush as gates opens and the wave forms over a concrete baffle below the water line.

    wandrlust:

    Big Surf

    Arizona’s Big Surf is one of those projects that belong to the era of post-war boosterism and the unassailable self-confidence of an Arcadian dream. However, four years prior to its opening in 1969 it was just an idea — plus a 30x40 foot wave tank built by construction engineer Phil Dexter. Today we take artificial wave beaches more or less for granted, but at the time Dexter’s Big Surf ranked along with the best of the arid land utopias conjured out of a barren wilderness: Taliesin, Biltmore, Arcosanti. Under the wide aegis of the city of Phoenix, Big Surf adds its own form of Waikiki picturesque into the alchemy of surf culture, water engineering, and the notion of a truly endless summer.

    When Big Surf first opened it boasted a five-foot wave every minute, but over the years the waves have become smaller and less regular, perhaps synonymous with its diminishing status among many of today’s grander artificial wave systems. Of course, surfers can still appreciate its magnitude; the system’s pumps draw 50,000 gallons of water into giant cisterns within the wall, and when the wave comes it is triggered in booming flush as gates opens and the wave forms over a concrete baffle below the water line.

    Reblogged from: wandrlust
  6. stereogum:

Paul Simon, Jack White, & Eddie Vedder at the Mariners game.

What is going on here?

    stereogum:

    Paul Simon, Jack White, & Eddie Vedder at the Mariners game.

    What is going on here?

    Reblogged from: stereogum
  7. Reblogged from: highenoughtoseethesea
  8. Clay Shirky, pulling no punches on Medium:

    The future of print remains what? Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really.

    Brutal, but a must-read.

  9. highenoughtoseethesea:

Parko
Photo: Pat Stacy

    highenoughtoseethesea:

    Parko

    Photo: Pat Stacy

    Reblogged from: highenoughtoseethesea
  10. highenoughtoseethesea:

Heavy.
    Reblogged from: highenoughtoseethesea
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